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“ICSR provides a great platform for serious, constructive dialogue on the most hotly debated issues, as well as a source of world-class expertise on many of the international challenges we face.”

Ambassador Mitchell B. Reiss

Former Director of Policy Planning, U.S. State Department

Find Out More About ICSR

The International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR) is a world-class and internationally acclaimed academic research centre based in the Department of War Studies at King’s College London.

Working across a number of different academic disciplines and in several languages, ICSR conducts thematic research on some of the world’s most pressing issues. Our researchers are often among the first to discover new trends, identify emerging patterns, and have harnessed the capacity of ‘big data’ to bring an empirical understanding to the study of international security and terrorism issues.

“The work done by ICSR is so important, because it looks at all kinds of terrorism and extremism. It helps us understand historical trends and patterns, so we don’t repeat the mistakes of the past.”

President Chandrika Kumaratunga

Former President of Sri Lanka

Foreign Fighters and the Returnee Threat

ICSR has developed some of the most sophisticated open-source methods used by academics today to better understand the origins, role and involvement of the foreign fighters participating in the Syrian confict.

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Islamist and Jihadist Non-State Actor Governance in the Arab World

This expansive project has been designed to trace and describe the challenges to power, politics, and governance posed by these key Islamist groups, particularly since 2011.

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The Women and Minors of Islamic State

At its peak, Islamic State governed over 11 million people in Syria and Iraq in a territory that once exceeded the size of the United Kingdom. Among these millions were an estimated 41,490 men, women and minors, who travelled to, or were born into, the Islamic State project.

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Best Practices in Extremist Offender Management: a European survey

In 2010, we conducted an extensive study of radicalisation and de-radicalisation within prison systems. We compared 15 countries, analysing prison regimes, patterns of radicalisation, and good practices for re-integration and rehabilitation.

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The Crime-Terror Nexus

Many of the jihadist terrorist attacks that have hit Europe in recent years, leaving hundreds dead and many more injured, had some sort of overlap with the criminal world with a significant number of attackers having criminal pasts.

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The Violent Far-right

The challenge presented by violent non-state actors was brought into sharp relief at the start of the century with the 9/11 attacks when al-Qaeda attacked the United States. The intervening period has given way to a series of more diffuse and splintered movements, from all parts of the political spectrum.

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Extremism, Terrorism and Strategic Communication

Jihadist propaganda has never been more salient but its motivations and impact are often misunderstood. This research examines online and offline public diplomacy efforts from the likes of the Islamic State, al-Qaeda, and Hay’at Tahrir al-Sham (HTS) in Syria.

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Terrorist Content Classifier

The challenge presented by violent non-state actors was brought into sharp relief at the start of the century with the 9/11 attacks when al-Qaeda attacked the United States. The intervening period has given way to a series of more diffuse and splintered movements…

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Extremist Tactical Innovation and Diffusion

This project examines the diffusion of terrorist attack planning and ways to hamper the malevolently creative, destructive capability of ideologically motivated individuals or terrorist organisations.

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